Urbanism

Hollaback! Baltimore site directors: Shawna Potter and Melanie Keller. Photo By: Casey McKeel

On February 8th, 2013, Hollaback! Baltimore celebrated its two year anniversary here in Charm City with a grand birthday bash at The Windup Space. It rang in true party style with dancing, live and dj'd music, door prizes, art performaces, magic, and cake (vegan and nonvegan was deliciousy in store!). The popular bar and performance venue was packed with folks from an admirable array of backgrounds. This fact heralds the importance of the work that Hollaback!

Protestors in a neighborhood adjacent to Ofer Prison. Photo By: Joshua Stephens

By now, the world is beginning to hear about Arafat Jaradat. A young Palestinian father, imprisoned three months without charge, in the notorious Israeli Megiddo Military Prison. Allegedly, he'd been involved in throwing stones. Two nights ago, he died, still in custody. Still without charge or trial.

Image source: www.anteropietila.com

In “Not in my Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City,” former Sun reporter and editor Antero Pietila focuses in on one facet of Baltimore’s history: namely, how housing patterns have evolved in Baltimore City along racial and religious lines over the last hundred years. With a journalist’s eye for detail, Pietila describes many colorful characters involved in the real estate scene, including politicians, civic leaders, bureaucrats, homeowners, developers and agents. For local activists, the book provides food for thought about an issue that strikes close to home, if you will forgive the pun.

Students Not Scores! Activism at McKeldin Square. Photo By: Iris Kirsch. (Note: EDS and the ISO are unaffiliated.)

To Teachers, Students, Parents, and citizens:

As teachers, and as activists for social justice, Educators for Democratic Schools is proudly in solidarity with all teachers, parents and students who are standing up to the madness of standardized testing

Computer-generated image of the future 25th Street Station. (source: 25thstreetstation.com)

On January 22, the Maryland Court of Appeals threw out the last remaining legal case brought against the planned development known as 25th Street Station. Like most previous attempts by critics of the project—a handful of community and business groups—the recent ruling never addressed the real issue behind the entire controversy: whether or not local businesses would suffer from the appearance of a retail giant like Walmart.

Thanks again to everyone that joined us for our Human Rights Dialogue on January 19. We had a great turnout and excellent discussion. The overarching themes of the event were Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Poor People’s Campaign and learning to connect our struggles. The video below, which is footage an activity we performed at the dialogue, exemplifies this point.

From Strategic Dialogue. Photo By: Casey McKeel

Thanks again to everyone that joined us for our Human Rights Dialogue on January 19. We had a great turnout and excellent discussion. The overarching themes of the event were Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Poor People’s Campaign and learning to connect our struggles. The video below, which is footage an activity we performed at the dialogue, exemplifies this point.

Students protest tuition hikes. Source: CNN.

My mother was the oldest of 5 children, raised in a small apartment in the Bronx. Her immigrant parents had no opportunity to go to college, and were very proud of her when she graduated near the top of her class and got a full scholarship to study math at Mercy College.

Image Design by Ananda La Vita

Dovetail is an interview series that focuses on the subject of social movements, with special attention given to movement-building here in the Baltimore area. As the title suggests, a major aim of the series will be to look at where the various activist-efforts taking place in Baltimore fit together, reinforce each other, intersect, etc. Here, in the second instalment of Dovetail, I interview Kate Khatib, a founder and current worker-owner at Red Emma's. Here, Khatib discusses the ideological foundations for Red Emma's, the project's relationship to the broader Baltimore public, its role in movement-building in Baltimore, and the significance of its upcoming move to 30 West North Avenue.

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