Education

Welcome back world! This is the third segment of our Baltimore-centric (although not exclusive) headline-news-round-up called Sounds of Independent News. We are committed to posting snippets of independent news, to help equip and inform local social justice activists and organizations. We are committed to posting regular segments and updates. We solicit your important news and announcements, as well as any suggestions and ideas. Email us at: indypendentreader@gmail.com

In consideration of the 1,600[i] public school supporters from Baltimore who demonstrated in the rain in Annapolis last month protesting the proposed budget cuts in education spending, I felt it necessary to reflect on the event and how it relates to the state of education. I found myself immediately questioning what effect this demonstration would have on education even if successful in preventing cuts in spending.

The Gender Identity Anti-Discrimination Act, House Bill 235, was one of the most controversial pieces of legislation this year. It died on the Senate floor this afternoon, Monday, April 11th, 2010.

HB 235

The bill aimed to protect transgender and gender-deviant/variant individuals in places of employment, housing, and credit. It wasn’t only highly debated between conservatives and liberals, per the usual “Who is more human than another?” -  but was also contentiously fought between Baltimore’s LGBTQ community.

Luz Rivera de la organizacion - Consejo Nacional Urbano Campesino (CNUC) basada en Tlaxcala México - Platicó en el espacio comunitario/ colectivo, Red Emma's en Baltimore, MD, EUA. Ella habló sobre la historia de la organización, de sus luchas, de lxs campesinxs en el centro de mexico, la lucha en contra del ‘mal gobierno' y sus partidos, y por la construcción de autonomía de la manera Tlaxcalteca.

Click here for Part 1

Click here for Part 2

This is the third installation of a three part extensive and exclusive interview with Betty Garman Robinson, a veteran activist of the Civil Rights Movement, former organizer of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and relentless inter-generational fighter for social justice. Betty was a co-editor and contributor to the recently published book "Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by the Women of SNCC"

 

Click here for Part 1

This is the second installation of a three part extensive and exclusive interview with Betty Garman Robinson, a veteran activist of the Civil Rights Movement, former organizer of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and relentless inter-generational fighter for social justice. Betty was a co-editor and contributor to the recently published book "Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by the Women of SNCC"

Working to create support for parents and children is one of my main forms of political activism (see http://dontleaveyourfriendsbehind.blogspot.com/), so after reading reports of how the protesters had settled into a camp within the Capitol Building that included childcare, I wanted to find out more.

This is the first installation of a three part extensive and exclusive interview with Betty Garman Robinson, a veteran activist of the Civil Rights Movement, former organizer of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and relentless inter-generational fighter for social justice. Betty was a co-editor and contributor to the recently published book "Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by the Women of SNCC"

It is without a doubt that racial and ethnic segregation continues to play a significant role in the make up of Baltimore City. This is blatantly evident in a graphic depiction of cenusus data put out by the New York Times, where different colored dots on a map depict the distribution of racial and ethnic groups. Here in Baltimore the depiction is stark and divided.

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